Beta blockers

Beta blockers

Beta inhibitors or beta-blockers are a group of drugs used to lower high blood pressure and treat various heart conditions, such as heart failure, arrhythmia, chest pain (angina), or heart attack. 

Beta blockers work by inhibiting the effect of the hormone epinephrine or adrenaline, which is a hormone that works to increase the heart rate and trigger the work of the heart muscle. By inhibiting the hormone, the heart will beat slower and blood pressure will drop.

Beta blockers also have the effect of dilating blood vessels, so blood circulation can increase. In addition to the heart and blood vessels, beta blockers can be used to overcome migraines, glaucoma, tremors, anxiety disorders, and hyperthyroidism.

Beta blockers can only be used with a doctor's prescription and instructions.

Types of Beta Blockers

There are 3 types of beta blockers that are divided based on how they work and the side effects they cause, namely:

Nonselective beta blockers

Nonselective beta blockers work by blocking beta-1 and beta-2 receptors, thus affecting the heart, blood vessels, and respiratory tract. This drug can cause side effects in the form of narrowing of the respiratory tract, making it dangerous for asthma or COPD sufferers .

Examples of nonselective beta blockers are:

  • Nadolol
  • Propranolol
  • Sotalol
  • Timolol

Selective beta blockers

Selective beta blockers work by blocking only beta-1 receptors in the heart. This drug does not affect the respiratory tract. Examples of selective beta blockers are:

  • Atenolol
  • Acebutolol
  • Betaxolol
  • Bisoprolol
  • Metoprolol

Third generation beta blockers

This beta blocker not only inhibits the beta-1 receptor, but also the alpha receptor, so it has the effect of dilating blood vessels and lowering blood pressure. Examples of third generation beta blockers are:

  • Carvedilol
  • Labetalol
  • Nebivolol

Precautions Before Using Beta Blockers 

Before using beta blockers, you need to pay attention to the following things:

  • Do not use beta blockers if you have a history of allergies to drugs of this group.
  • Before taking beta blockers, tell your doctor if you are also using amiodarone, baclofen, tamsulosin, levodopa, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs ), flu drugs, allergy drugs, asthma drugs,  insulin , antidiabetics, nitrate drugs , antidepressants, or antacids.
  • Tell your doctor if you have had or are currently suffering from asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes,  hypotension , bradycardia, acidosis,  congestive heart failure , severe peripheral artery disease,  Raynaud's syndrome , or sick sinus syndrome .
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are using other medicines, including supplements or herbal products.
  • Tell your doctor if you have ever experienced  NAPZA abuse or alcohol addiction .
  • Maintain a diet that is low in bad cholesterol and fat, because beta-blockers can lower good cholesterol (HDL) levels and increase triglyceride levels.
  • Do not stop treatment suddenly without consulting a doctor first.
  • See a doctor immediately if you experience an allergic reaction, serious side effects, or overdose after taking beta blockers.

Side Effects and Dangers of Beta Blockers

Here are some side effects that may appear as a result of the use of beta-blockers:

  • Turn
  • Fatigue
  • Sleepy
  • Cold or tingling hands and feet
  • Dry mouth, skin, and eyes
  • Headache
  • Stomachache
  • Weight gain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea or constipation

Although rare, see a doctor immediately if you experience any of the more serious side effects below:

  • Heart disorders characterized by chest pain, swollen ankles or legs, irregular heartbeat, or shortness of breath and cough that worsen with physical activity.
  • Lung disorders characterized by shortness of breath or  wheezing
  • A liver disorder marked by yellowing of the eyes and skin
  • Joint pain and back pain
  • Skin rash
  • Decreased sexual desire or erectile dysfunction
  • Insomnia
  • Sore throat
  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Hypoglycemia

Types, Brands, and Doses of Beta Blockers

The dose of beta blockers can vary, depending on the type and name of the drug, namely:

1. Selective beta blockers

Below is a breakdown of the dosage of selective beta-blockers:

Atenolol

Trademarks: Atenolol, Betablok, Farnormin 50, Internolol 50, Lotensi, Niften

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the atenolol drug page .

Acebutolol

Trademarks:-

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the acebutolol drug page .

Betaxolol

Trademarks: Betoptime, Optibet, Tonor

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the betaxolol drug page .

Bisoprolol

Trademarks: Tencard, Bipro 2,5. B-Beta, Biofin, Bipro, Biscor, Beta-One, Bisoprolol Fumarate, Bisovell, Cosyrel 10/10, Carbisol, Concor, Concor AM, Hapsen Plus, Hapsen, Konblobet, Lodoz, Maintate 5, Miniten, Opiprol 5, Selbix

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the bisoprolol drug page .

Metoprolol

Trademarks: Fapressor, Loprolol, Lopressor, Betaloc Zok

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the metoprolol drug page .

2. Nonselective beta blockers

Below is a breakdown of the dosage of nonselective beta blockers:

Nadolol

Trademarks:-

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the nadolol drug page .

Propranolol 

Trademarks: Farmadral 10, Liblok 40, Propranolol, Propranolol HCl

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the propranolol drug page .

Sotalol

Trademarks:-

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the sotalol drug page .

Timolol

Trademarks: Azarga, Cosopt, Duotrav, Glaoplus, Isotic Adretor 0.25%, Isotic Adretor 0.5%, Opthil, Tim-Ophtal, Timo-Comod 0.5%, Timol, Ximex Opticom, Xalacom

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the timolol drug page .

3. Third generation beta blockers

Below are the dosage details of third generation beta blockers:

Carvedilol

Trademarks: Blorec, Bloved 25, Carvilol 6,25, Carvilol 25, Carvedilol, V-Bloc

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the carvedilol drug page .

Labetalol

Trademarks:-

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the labetalol drug page .

Nebivolol

Trademarks: Linoven, Nebilet, Nebivolol Hydrochloride, Nebivolol, Nevodio

To find out complete information about this drug, please visit the nebivolol drug page .

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