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Cold Allergy

Cold Allergy

Cold allergies are hives that appear due to cold air . Cold allergy is characterized by bumps and itching on the skin that appear a few minutes after exposure to cold temperatures.

Cold allergy usually occurs in adolescents who are growing up. This allergic reaction will go away on its own, but it can also be treated with anti-allergic drugs if it is felt to be bothersome. Once gone, allergic reactions can reappear if the sufferer is exposed to cold temperatures.

Cold allergies usually go away completely after a few years, but they can last a lifetime.

Cold Allergy Causes

Cold allergy occurs when the skin is exposed to cold water or cold air. When exposed to cold temperatures, the body will release histamine, which is a chemical that causes an allergic reaction.

Not yet known why cold air can cause allergic reactions. However, sensitive skin is thought to be one of the contributing factors. In addition, other factors that can increase the risk of cold allergies are:

  • Age
    Children and adolescents are the age group most commonly affected by cold allergies, but they usually clear up on their own within a few years.
  • Cold allergies
    are more at risk for people with cancer, hepatitis , or people who have recently had an infection.
  • Offspring
    Children whose parents suffer from cold allergies are also at risk of suffering from the same condition.

Cold Allergy Symptoms

The main symptom of a cold allergy is hives . Hives are red bumps on the skin that feel itchy. The size of the bumps can vary, from the width of a green pea to the width of a grape.

These symptoms appear on the skin exposed to cold temperatures, can be water or air. Hives are more common as a result of exposure to humid and windy air. When the temperature of the skin begins to warm, symptoms can actually worsen. Hives can last for 2 hours before eventually disappearing on their own.

In addition to hives, cold allergies can also cause swelling of the body parts that touch cold objects, for example:

  • On the hands, due to holding cold objects
  • On the lips, after consuming cold food or drinks

When does h go to the doctor

As previously mentioned, hives due to cold allergies generally last for 2 hours. If hives do not improve for up to 2 days, consult a doctor immediately. Also consult a doctor if the hives become more widespread and a fever appears .

A severe allergic reaction ( anaphylactic shock ) can occur when the whole body is exposed to cold temperatures, for example when swimming in cold water. This condition can be life threatening. Immediately go to the emergency department (IGD) if symptoms appear in the form of:

  • Swollen face
  • Dark view
  • A cold sweat
  • Heart beat
  • Hard to breathe

Cold Allergy Diagnosis

To find out if your hives are caused by a cold allergy, try placing an ice cube on your skin for 5 minutes. If after removing the ice cubes, red bumps appear on your skin, you most likely have a cold allergy.

After that, consult with your doctor to find out the cause of the hives you are experiencing. The doctor will ask about the symptoms that appear and the diseases that have been or are being suffered, then followed by a physical examination. The doctor may also repeat the test with an ice cube to confirm a cold allergy.

If the doctor suspects other causes, additional tests will be ordered, such as blood tests or urine tests. Other tests that can be done depending on the type of disease suspected by the doctor.

Cold Allergy Treatment

To find out if your hives are caused by a cold allergy, try placing an ice cube on your skin for 5 minutes. If after removing the ice cubes, red bumps appear on your skin, you most likely have a cold allergy.

After that, consult with your doctor to find out the cause of the hives you are experiencing. The doctor will ask about the symptoms that appear and the diseases that have been or are being suffered, then followed by a physical examination. The doctor may also repeat the test with an ice cube to confirm a cold allergy.

If the doctor suspects other causes, additional tests will be ordered, such as blood tests or urine tests. Other tests that can be done depending on the type of disease suspected by the doctor.

Cold Allergy Treatment

Cold allergies can go away on their own after a while. However, if symptoms are bothersome, sufferers can relieve them by taking medication, especially if serious allergy symptoms appear, such as shortness of breath.

The main treatment for cold allergies is to avoid exposure to cold temperatures. However, if you have to work in cold temperatures so that an allergic reaction cannot be avoided, take medication to relieve symptoms and prevent the allergic reaction from reappearing.

Drugs that can be used to relieve cold allergy symptoms are antihistamines . The type of antihistamine drug that is usually given is cetirizine, loratadine , or desloratadine.

H2 antagonist medications , such as ranitidine , famotidine, and cimetidine, can also help relieve cold allergy symptoms. These drugs can be given if regular antihistamines are not working.

Other medicines that can also be used to relieve cold allergy symptoms are:

  • Corticosteroids
  • Capsaicin oil
  • Omalizumab
  • Leukotriene receptor agonist drugs , such as zafir l ukast and monteluklast

In cold allergy sufferers who develop anaphylactic shock, the doctor will give an injection of epinephrine .

Cold Allergy Prevention

Although cold allergy symptoms can go away on their own and can be relieved with medication, as much as possible still avoid exposure to cold air to prevent allergic reactions.

Cold allergy prevention can be done in the following ways:

  • Protects skin from exposure to air, water, or cold objects
  • Avoid consuming cold food and drinks to prevent the throat from swelling
  • Take medicine according to doctor's prescription
  • Inform the doctor or medical staff before surgery, to prevent cold allergic reactions in the operating room
  • Consult a doctor about whether or not to take antihistamines before traveling to cold weather
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